Belong Illustrations

The brief
While freelancing at Belong I was asked to create a set of illustrations that the design team and also the wider company could use for different channels. 

The problem
The main problem I felt was that the Belong brand wasn't complete. As I was working on a short deadline there wasn't enough time to create an informed set of illustrations that would fully represent the Belong brand. Without any existing brand guidelines or brand strategy, I came up with a starting point to how we could as a collective start this process.

I decided we had to begin by finding out what makes our customers and our colleagues unique. Starting with the customer and doing as much research as possible. Then moving onto the experience of my Belong teammates. 

Questions
How do we launch new brand illustrations/icons without adding to the clutter of current tech illustration out there? How do we do this while collaborating with our customers and our Belong teammates?

The solution
I created a set of ​unique​, interchangeable and dynamic character illustrations based upon our customers and our colleagues.

How
1. By interviewing customers and colleagues we gathered interesting stories (gender, ethnicity, culture) which I used to create visual representations –'quirks’.

2. I created a visual framework and with the help of some creative code, we created a character generator.

Screenshot 2020-03-05 at 13.25.15

Proof of concept
I created a quick illustration style to test the concept and communicate the idea to the team. This was meant to be disposable and established properly after the proof of concept.

By creating 8 categories of 8 visual quirks, it allowed us to generate over 160,000 different unique characters which we called 'Belongers'. Above you can see a small range of the ones we generated.

Deliverables
100% unique .svg characters created from the framework of character quirks, which were displayed in the browser. The character generator also featured in the Belong company hack day along with other POCs.

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© Samuel Hoh 2018